Author Topic: What Camera Do I Need?  (Read 27246 times)

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Offline gemlover

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Re: What Camera Do I Need?
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2012, 05:01:55 PM »
I have redone my pictures at least three times so far and probably will do them again as I learn more.  BTW, my camera is 6 years old, birthday present when I turned 60.

John
John Atwell Rasmussen, PhD, AJP
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desertrose0601

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Re: What Camera Do I Need?
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2013, 04:23:57 PM »
I realize this post is really old, but just wanted to throw in my two cents.


My theory is that you should only buy the best camera that you know what to do with. When you can verbalize why you're current camera is unable to execute a feature that you know you should be able to do with a camera... that's when you buy a new camera. Until then, learn your current camera to it's fullest and best ability. I guarantee you, even the worst cameras can do more than you realize they can do if you understand photography mechanics and theory.


In other words, a fancy camera doesn't a photographer make. Learn the basics of aperture and shutter speed, using light, color balance, composing an image, etc. These are the things that will improve your photos, not getting a better camera. Once you learn these, you will soon understand WHY a better camera can help you achieve a better image, at which point you'll be ready to upgrade. Just getting a camera before you understand the basics of photography won't do you any good. A camera's just a tool, and it can only help you as much as you are willing to invest in learning how photography works.

Offline JimJuris

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Re: What Camera Do I Need?
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2013, 12:11:23 AM »
I agree with this 10,000%.

When I purchased my DSLR camera about 6 1/2 years ago, the first thing that I did was spend about 12 hours reading the camera owner's manual before I tried to take any photographs.



I realize this post is really old, but just wanted to throw in my two cents.


My theory is that you should only buy the best camera that you know what to do with. When you can verbalize why you're current camera is unable to execute a feature that you know you should be able to do with a camera... that's when you buy a new camera. Until then, learn your current camera to it's fullest and best ability. I guarantee you, even the worst cameras can do more than you realize they can do if you understand photography mechanics and theory.


In other words, a fancy camera doesn't a photographer make. Learn the basics of aperture and shutter speed, using light, color balance, composing an image, etc. These are the things that will improve your photos, not getting a better camera. Once you learn these, you will soon understand WHY a better camera can help you achieve a better image, at which point you'll be ready to upgrade. Just getting a camera before you understand the basics of photography won't do you any good. A camera's just a tool, and it can only help you as much as you are willing to invest in learning how photography works.

Offline Brusheswithaview

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Re: What Camera Do I Need?
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2013, 06:14:57 AM »
I received a Canon Rebel t3 for christmas, it has so many setting and It seems when I use it on auto I get all gray light all over the glasses, I guess with the reflection its bound to happen . My I phone is my choice now until I figure out all the settings. Which Photo editing software do you all use ? I would love to white out the background of my photos


Ann

Offline JimJuris

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Re: What Camera Do I Need?
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2013, 11:23:43 PM »
Ann, I use and highly recommend using GIMP for editing your photos.  GIMP software is FREE from gimp.org.  GIMP can do just about anything and everything that Photoshop can do. 

GIMP has a fairly steep learning curve but I solved that problem with my step by step GIMP photo editing ebook.  I sell this ebook on Handmade Artists.  My GIMP ebook was written so that an average fifteen year old child can read the ebook and be able to perform the task that they are learning from reading my ebook.

My ebook has an immediate download too.